Six Dots: NBP’s plans for the New Year

Each year at NBP, we look forward to celebrating two very important days: New Year’s Day, which is all about setting goals for the upcoming year; and Louis Braille’s birthday (January 4th), which inspires us to be as bold and ambitious in our goals as he was in his life.

Louis Braille’s intellectual curiosity and determination drove him to create the braille code, which has brought literacy and independence to countless blind children and adults. Share his amazing life story with Jen Bryant’s new picture book, Six Dots: A Story of Young Louis Braille, now available in print/braille.

sixdots

Inspired by his example, we at NBP will never stop advocating relentlessly for braille and braille literacy.

We will continue to grow our innovative Great Expectations program, which brings picture books to life for blind children through song, tactile play, engaged listening, and body movement. We will continue to serve families and teachers of the blind and visually impaired with our ReadBooks! program, which provides free bags of beginning braille materials to early braille learners to engage them early towards a path of braille literacy. We will continue to offer the fun Children’s Braille Book Club, which puts popular children’s books into the hands of children on a monthly basis. And, most importantly, we will continue to develop new, creative, and original children’s programs to meet the needs of all our young readers.

In addition to growing our children’s programs, here is what we have in the works for the new year:

  • We pledge to advocate for every blind and visually impaired child, veteran, and adult to have the tools and opportunities to learn braille.  We will continue to provide braille materials in every format that is needed to support braille literacy, including developing e-braille solutions at the lowest price possible.
  • We will strive to continue to expand our outreach and education with braille courses, offering training in Unified English Braille in the spring and specialty workshops on tactile graphics, formats, and technical materials in the months that follow.
  • Just as you’ve always been able to rely on NBP’s Publications department for excellent books on Apple/iOS products, our goal for the new year is to provide equally exciting books on Android-based apps and devices. In 2016 we published Getting Started with Android and plan to add even more books to serve the wide-ranging technology interests of our community.
  • In 2017, we also want to focus on getting more face-to-face time with our customers, by attending more exhibits and conventions around the country. We get so many ideas and so much good, constructive feedback when our customers have the opportunity to browse our books and products in person!
  • Attending more conferences nationwide will also give us the opportunity to network with additional businesses, educating them on the importance of providing braille materials.
  • Finally, we will strive to connect more with our customers and supporters by hosting more Because Braille Matters luncheons across the country, bringing the A Million Laughs for Literacy Gala to more people, developing activities and events that showcase our mission, and increasing the number of Literacy Champions who donate to us each month.

Updated 1/24/17

MVPs of NBP: Spotlight on our Volunteers

 

Eagle Investments volunteers collating Frozen

Eagle Investments volunteers collating Frozen

The end of the year is a great time to celebrate and honor the communities to which we belong. Whether by giving gifts to loved ones, donating canned goods, or baking cookies for a social gathering, now is a perfect moment to think about how you can give back.

National Braille Press is fortunate to have a group of people– 325 to be exact–who give back all year round: our volunteers.

The gifts of volunteers’ time, enthusiasm, and hard work keep National Braille Press’s mission alive and well.

Volunteers put together each month’s Children’s Braille Book Club selection.

volunteers-at-one-boston-day-event-2016-after-collating-froggy-gets-dressed

One Boston Day volunteers with Froggy Gets Dressed

They assist at events like the A Million Laughs for Literacy Gala, ushering guests and collecting auction bids.

Volunteers man the front desk, serving as the first point of contact to callers and visitors to NBP.

Volunteers stuff envelopes for mailings, recruit Literacy Champions, paint the side of our building, and so much more!

A few hours of time dedicated to NBP add up and help us continue our mission. Our volunteers have put together over one million pages of print/braille books and contributed over 2,500 hours of service!

Volunteers also raised tens of thousands of dollars for NBP through running the Boston Marathon and the Blindfold Challenge.

Their dedication is vital to keeping braille materials affordable for blind children and adults.

Volunteering at NBP is a lot of fun as well! It’s a great way to bond with colleagues outside the office. You can make new friends with folks who also value accessibility during projects. And some volunteers have even turned collating braille books into an unconventional date!

tufts-group-photos-111916

Tufts Health Plan volunteers with Interrupting Chicken

Nonprofits around Boston rely on volunteers for tasks ranging from mentoring to serving meals. NBP is no different—and our volunteers get the chance to say that they personally helped put together 300 or 400 books for blind children. Volunteering with us could be a great conversation starter at your next social gathering, and an opportunity to share the importance of braille with someone else.

Consider joining our volunteer team of over 325 strong by emailing volunteer@nbp.org.

And to our current volunteers, thank you for being a part of the NBP community. Thank you for your investment in braille literacy and commitment to the projects. Your time and contribution makes a big difference.

We look forward to seeing you again in 2017!

First Impressions: Why You Need Braille Business Cards

Recently, NBP worked with the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation in Boston to produce braille labels for their business cards. We asked Executive Director of the Foundation Steven M. Rothstein some questions on why he got his cards done in braille.

NBP: Why do you think braille business cards are important?

Steven: “Accessibility and inclusion were important to President Kennedy, and I thought this would be a valuable statement about their importance today.

In addition, I have prior experience working with groups and individuals with different levels of abilities and challenges, including those with visual impairment. I want to be able to effectively communicate with those individuals.”

NBP: What motivated you to get these done?

Steven: “The unemployment and underemployment rate for people with low or no vision is very high in our society. This is a small step to raise awareness and encourage others to be inclusive in their workplace as well.”

Front and back of braille business card

NBP has worked with many organizations and companies to provide braille business cards, from College of the Holy Cross to The Iris Network.

Ordering braille business cards is a simple step toward accessibility for your business. Having your cards done shows people you care about their reading needs. It also creates a conversation. The cards are very appealing to someone when you are networking. By having braille on your cards, you are opening up a conversation. What do they say in braille? Why is accessibility important to your business?

NBP’s Director of Sales Nicole Noble has been using her braille business cards for 8 years to network and connect with a wide variety of people. Nicole says, “Having braille business cards has opened the door to many conversations with both sighted and visually impaired individuals. They have served as a platform to raise awareness and communicate proficiently to exchange information and resources.”

-Whitney Mooney, Sales Associate and Social Media Creative

The Impact of #GivingTuesday

If you’re like me, any time one of your friends or aunts uses a hashtag in a Facebook or Twitter post, you might scratch your head in bewilderment. How does a pound sign before a catch phrase or acronym benefit anybody?

Well, there is one hashtag in particular that’s used once a year, on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, that makes a direct impact in communities around the country—#GivingTuesday.

#GivingTuesday is a global day of giving on November 29th, fueled by the power of social media and collaboration. It’s a day for supporters of organizations to spread awareness and raise money for good causes.

And it’s not just the cool thing to do that day that will get you loads of likes and boost your dopamine levels; it actually does create impactful and longstanding change!

Skeptical? In 2014, National Braille Press supporters kick-started fundraising for the Great Expectations: Bringing Picture Books to Life for Blind Kids program. It was through your posts and your donations, many just $10 or $25, on #GivingTuesday that we raised over $11,000 for this program!

ge-books

The five books in the Great Expectations series so far

NBP’s #GivingTuesday movement produced the second selection for Great Expectations, The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Dewalt. It’s a tale about a cohort of disgruntled crayons who want more from life. The green crayon is fed up with being associated with trees, while the gray crayon has grown disillusioned with shading illustrations of hippopotamuses.

The book was accompanied by a print/braille coloring kit and tactile coloring pages for blind and visually impaired kids to encourage creativity and learning about color. The Great Expectations website also offered a whole host of fun and educational activities to talk about the context and significance of color in correlation with the book. This was made possible by YOU!

#GivingTuesday participants spoke to NBP staff about how excited they were to help this program take flight, and how the mission of Great Expectations inspired them to contribute even a small amount. They spread the word by sharing how National Braille Press has benefited and inspired them with the hashtag #GivingTuesday.

NBP continued to build on your enthusiasm and support and the success of that selection with the publication of more books in our Great Expectations series: Amazing Grace; Iggy Peck, Architect; and Pete the Cat: Rocking in My School Shoes. This is the power of #GivingTuesday: 1,492 Great Expectations books distributed to families across the country. That’s 1,492 holistic and fun educational experiences for blind children to learn about color, architecture, acting and improvisation, and so much more.

It’s easy to become disillusioned by the chaos of social media—there can be too much information to consume and far too many Netflix cliffhangers to rant about. However, social media offers a platform for many voices to create change in our own small way—building a steady flow of social consciousness, one newsfeed at a time. So why not make it about NBP?

On Tuesday, November 29th, take the leap and post using #GivingTuesday to talk about what braille literacy means to you and your community, and make a contribution of $5, $25, or even $100.

This year, we’re advocating for our imperative Readbooks! Because Braille Matters program, a FREE program that supports families of blind children in the beginning of their braille education.

Let’s be inspired by our success in 2014 and realize that we can be game changers for braille literacy… all with a pound sign. Don’t miss out!

 

—Elizabeth Kent, Events and Volunteers Manager

NBP Staff Thanksgivings

A few of us here at National Braille Press wanted to share our favorite Thanksgiving traditions and memories. Tell us yours, too!

lobster-pot-tree

On Black Friday, my family takes a ferry to Block Island, a small 3-mile wide island off the coast of Rhode Island, for the annual “Christmas Stroll.” Island shops welcome visitors with hot cider and chocolate, selling gifts and sundries, and the locals have constructed a huge “lobster pot Christmas tree.” We make sure to hit the beach (deserted this time of year) and finally stop in the local pub for a brew and late lunch before our cruise home.

—Jackie Sheridan

 

As a child of divorce, I have the benefit of two meals. I usually spend Thanksgiving Day with my dad, eating all of our favorite snacks and watching Criminal Minds. We eat a traditional turkey dinner with my favorite dish, sweet potatoes. At night, I go to my mom’s house for piles on piles of dessert. My mom’s house is filled with music, so we spend the night enjoying great tunes and a sugar coma!

—Whitney Mooney

 

My maternal side of the family are all from Canada, including me, so we typically recognize Canadian Thanksgiving in October and American Thanksgiving in November with nice meals, but don’t really celebrate them.

The only “tradition” I can think of is that we always put the pumpkin pie on top of the coffee pot because the first year we had our dog, Tucker, he jumped on the counter and poked his nose in the pie so there was a giant hole dug into it.

—Hannah Ransom Canning

 

My brother and I always watch the National Dog Show.

—Elizabeth Kent

 

My favorite Thanksgiving tradition—besides all the wonderful, homemade food and the joy of having the entire family together—is that before we ate, we would go around the table and everyone would share what they were thankful for that year.

—Kesel Wilson

 

Every Friday after Thanksgiving (before it became known as Black Friday), my family and I would go to the Worcester Gallery and then the Auburn Mall for holiday sales, decorations, and music. We always had the traditional meal of turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, and a fruit and nut tray.

—Elizabeth Bouvier

 

My dad likes to take everyone to the movies. We don’t have a very big family, so just getting to spend the day together is special.

—Josh Smaltz

 

We like to play Apples to Apples, Cards Against Humanity, or Risk with the cousins out of earshot of the adults.

—Joel Spinale

 

We watch football and make turkey and mashed potatoes, a traditional Thanksgiving.

—Cham Cha

 

My family, like many others, has a Thanksgiving tradition of eating A LOT! Food plays such a central role in bringing us together for good company and conversation around the dining table. “Aunt Debbie, this stuffing is amazing!” “Uncle Lance, I’ve never had a pecan pie I liked before, but this is fabulous!” Writing this now, I can almost feel the cozy warmth of our kitchen and smell the delicious smells that greet me as I come in from the biting cold of a late November day in Wisconsin.

Because food is so important to our family’s Thanksgiving celebration, I was uneasy four years ago at my first holiday meal after adopting a plant-based diet. What would I be able to eat? Would my family make fun of me? Or worse, would they feel that my choice to forego the turkey and sausage stuffing was a condemnation of the traditions so important to them? It turned out I needn’t have worried. There were curious questions about why in the world I had chosen this path, but they just made for more lively conversation in which none of us felt judged or defensive. And the best part? So much of what makes up the traditional American Thanksgiving plate turns out to be plants! From mashed potatoes to rolls, sweet potatoes to green bean casserole, cranberry sauce to pumpkin pie, all have plants as their main ingredients and can easily be made without milk, eggs, or butter and are just as delicious. I left that holiday table just as stuffed as I’d ever been, and with the peace that comes with living in line with the values I hold dear.

—Wynter Pingel

 

Thanksgiving is always about the whole family gathering together. As children, we always were excited to eat in the formal dining room with old English china and cut crystal pitchers full of apple cider, and my responsibility was to clean the tarnish off of my grandmother’s fancy silverware, monogrammed with “M” for our last name. I marveled how the darkened candle holders, spoons, forks, and knives could get all shiny and new again just by using a magic cream and rubbing them with a cloth. Now that I look back, it was the perfect chore to keep me busy and out of the way. The rest was just heaven: the whole family eating together, passing around the turkey, cranberry sauce, homemade stuffing, and the pumpkin pie smothered in fresh whipped cream!

—Brian Mac Donald