Chronicles from the Conventions

 

Three NBP staffers share their recent experiences at the NFB and ACB conventions:

Tony Grima, Vice President of Publications at NBP

This was my 16th national convention, and probably my 10th NFB National Convention! The first thing I noticed this year was how huge the Rosen Shingle Creek Hotel and Convention Center was. At the end of the first day, the pedometer app on my phone reported that I walked over 10,000 steps just getting from my room to the exhibit hall and back. To get to the exhibit hall from the room elevators, you first had to navigate through the restaurants, café, and gift shop area—a narrow path through randomly placed tables and chairs packed with diners and shoppers and convention goers. After that, the path opened up to three vast halls, one after the other, with the exhibits at the very end. All along the way, NFBers were yelling out directions and room locations to help the visually impaired attendees get where they needed to be. This happens every year, but something about the gigantic, frantic halls made this year more chaotic than ever. I made a short recording one day as I left the exhibit hall. Listen to what it’s like to be walking those halls…

http://www.nbp.org/downloads/nfb-halls.mp3

Another high point: At the exhibit booth in Orlando, a young woman came by several times to buy books. Each time, she asked a lot of questions about the books we offered, and the books she wished we offered. She really put me through the ringer, in a good way; she appreciated and supported NBP, but she also had some thoughtful questions and suggestions. In short, a memorable customer.

When I got back to the office and was entering orders from the convention, I opened this young woman’s customer record and discovered that she had received one of our free ReadBooks book bags about 10 years ago! ReadBooks book bags are meant to get braille into blind kids’ homes as early as possible, and are free to blind kids from birth to age seven. The book bags are filled with braille books and tactiles for the kids, as well as information about braille and other resources for the parents. This young woman’s mother had ordered the book bag years ago, and now that blind kid is a smart and inquisitive young woman, buying braille cookbooks and jewelry and, as I said, putting me through the ringer. It was humbling, gratifying, and inspiring to realize that the ReadBooks program, which I’ve helped work on since it was created, had played some small part in this amazing young woman’s life.

Kesel Wilson, Editor and Programs Manager, NBP

The ACB Convention in Minneapolis, Minnesota was my first convention and to say I learned a lot would be an understatement! One of the most fascinating things about learning of other peoples’ life experiences is that you learn so much about yourself at the same time. Probably one of my favorite experiences at the convention was meeting so many of our dedicated and loyal customers—people from all walks of life and all ages who have been supporting NBP for years, who eagerly await our new products, and who generously offer us ideas and feedback.

An incredibly fun and eye-opening experience was watching several adult customers exploring (and absolutely loving) our tactile graphic books, tactile coloring books, and tactile maze book. I’ll never forget when one person literally squealed with delight as she felt the Tyrannosaurus Rex tactile graphic in the Tactile Book of Dinosaurs. “What are these?” she asked when her fingers ran over the dinosaur arms? “The dinosaur’s arms,” I said. “WHAT???? They are so tiny! I had no idea that a dinosaur as huge as a T-Rex would have such puny arms!” she exclaimed.

Until that moment, I didn’t really have a deep understanding of the power of tactile graphics to convey information—information that I just take for granted. I’ve been seeing pictures of dinosaurs since I was a small child and never really gave much thought to what they look like. But for this woman, feeling the tactile graphic was a moment of pure discovery and it let her (and me) see the creature in entirely new ways. Thank you to all of the customers who came by our booth to talk, share thoughts, buy books, and have fun exploring our products. It was a pleasure to meet each one of you.

Whitney Mooney, Sales Administrator, NBP

The NFB Convention always comes right when I need a pick-me-up. Between the hustle and bustle of everyday work, the people of NFB have a way of bringing me back to the purpose of National Braille Press. Everyone stops by the table to tell us how much they love us and our books. They tell us so many beautiful stories about reading to their child or making dinner using our cook books. Every year it reminds me why I do what I do.

Braille: More than Words

For years I had heard what a wonderful experience it was to meet our customers and hear how much they value braille and National Braille Press. Of course, I had heard this sentiment expressed before given my long tenure at NBP. But it was a totally new experience hearing it over a period of several days from almost everyone who stopped by our booth when I attended my first ACB convention.

Several days back from my trip, I received an email from Leah Bernie whose parents were both blind. Her story, like so many of the stories I heard at the convention, touched my heart. Here’s what she had to say:

Dear National Braille Press, 

I am a sighted daughter of Sighted girl with print/braille booktwo blind adults, and I recently had a baby and ordered a board book from you for my mother to read with my daughter.  As a result, I started receiving your newsletter. This got me thinking about the impact your organization has had on my life, and I wanted to share that with you.  

My parents have both been avid readers since they learned Braille. My mother went blind in second grade and excelled in school and reading after she learned Braille. She recently retired from the State of Texas as a rehab and Braille instructor. Growing up, we had an abundance of print/Braille books and she would read to my sister and myself every night. As we got older, my mother would borrow chapter books from the library, and my sister and I would follow along in print as my mom read aloud.  

My father has been blind since he was a baby, and is one of the most well-read people I know. He has always been a great example of pursuing academic as well as pleasure reading. His stories of being young in rural Alabama and gaining access to Braille books have made me appreciate my own access to books.  

I am a high school teacher, and recently realized how very many families do not read together or have that as part of their lives. I am grateful that my parents have set that example and instilled such a love of reading in both myself and my sister. I am further grateful for the Children’s Braille Book Club for making that possible. You are also making it possible for my parents to connect with their grandchildren in a way that might not be possible otherwise. This realization nearly brought me to tears.  

The work you do is so important, and I am eternally grateful to have and continue to be benefitting from the accessibility of Braille. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!

Respectfully, 

Leah Bernie

Thank you, Leah, and thank you to so many others who took the time to tell me how much NBP has meant to them over the years. We are currently celebrating the 30th year of the Children’s Braille Book Club, and it is stories like yours that remind us what is important.

Blind iPhone Empowerment

I bought my first iPhone 4S only after downloading the first of NBP’s great books on the subject in 2011. Just three weeks ago, I was visiting my youngest son, Getting Started with the iPhone and iOS for Blind Users book coverDavid, in New York City and we decided to trek to the big Apple store in Grand Central Station so I could finally consider an upgrade to the iPhone 5S. I really wasn’t sure I wanted to upgrade just yet, but having a really experienced user with me to perhaps interpret anything that the salesperson was doing would be a help.

Upon entering the store, David says “There’s a blind guy with a guide dog working the sales counter.” NYC Apple storeSo naturally, we walked up to him and I began talking to him about the pros and cons of upgrading my phone. After a minute, he stops me and asks “What’s your first name?” When I tell him, he grabs my hand, “It’s Kyle Street from last summer’s ACB convention.”

My partner Kae and I had gone out with them for a great dinner last summer in Columbus; I had never met Kyle or his wife Chevonne before. He had been working at the Apple store in Raleigh – Durham at the time and transferred up to the New York City store the first of the year.

Finding Kyle at work ready to knowledgeably upgrade my phone made the decision really easy. For the next 45 minutes, we talked about the most useful blind friendly apps, what we liked and didn’t, and he gave me some pointers on using the 5S from our shared unique perspective. Kyle’s boss came over to listen and watch and get educated. Apparently, she had never seen him interact with a blind customer. We talked about NBP’s books and the braille screen protector guide on my phone, resources with which she was not familiar.

Nothing really unusual, right? Just a customer and a knowledgeable salesperson engaging in a transaction. Or, a great example of blind empowerment.

Video Description Goes Mainstream

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You’ll discover some of the best writing anywhere when listening to the work of a good describer – those masters of language who find just the right words to fit into the spaces between dialog, describing key visual elements, and perfectly matching the tone of a movie or TV show. Continue reading

Best-sellers from the 2013 Conventions

We’re just back from the 2013 conventions in Orlando and Columbus – the National Federation of the Blind, and the American Council of the Blind, respectively. Because these two conventions usually bump up against each other (they even overlap from time to time!), our Publications team splits up and sends two people to each convention.

Photo of Tim Turnbull chattin with a customer at the ACB Convention in Columbus.

Tim Turnbull chats with a customer at the ACB Convention in Columbus.

We spend most of our time at the conventions in the exhibit hall, showing and selling our books and other tactile products. We love getting to meet our customers and supporters face to face; our customers, in turn, appreciate the rare opportunity to browse a table full of braille books.

Now, we’re back in the office. We’ve entered the orders and tallied the sales – and here are the top-selling books and braille items from the 2013 conventions!

  1. iPhone iOS6 Updates, (all formats combined)
  2. Magnet: “Be the Person Your Dog Thinks You Are,” print/braille magnet
  3. Magnet: “Good friends are like stars. You don’t always see them, but you know they’re always there!” print/braille magnet
  4. Magnet: “The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched. They must be felt with the heart.” – Helen Keller, print/braille magnet
  5. iOS Success: Making the iPad Accessible, (all formats combined)
  6. Getting started with iPhone and iOS5 for Blind Users, (all formats combined)
  7. Wednesday Morning Quotations, braille spiral-bound booklet
  8. Magnet: “Life isn’t about waiting for the storm to pass. It’s about learning how to dance in the rain…” – Vivian Greene, print/braille magnet
  9. Magnet: “Keep Calm and Carry On,” print/braille magnet
  10. Twenty-Two Useful Apps for Blind iPhone Users (2nd Edition), (all formats combined)
  11. Magnet: “”Anyone can be cool, but awesome takes practice,” print/braille magnet
  12. Twenty-One Apps We Can’t Live Without, (all formats combined)
  13. Magnet: “What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.” – Emerson, print/braille magnet
  14. iPhone Tactile Screenshot Quick References iOS6, large print/braille & tactiles
  15. 100 Hungry Ants (with blocks), print/braille picture book with 100 blocks
  16. Froggy Learns to Swim, print/braille picture book
  17. (tie) Hop on Pop, print/braille board book
  18. (tie) That’s Not My Monkey!, print/braille board book
  19. (tie) Magnet: “To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world,” print/braille magnet
  20. (tie) Magnet: “Just when the caterpillar thought the world was over, it became a butterfly,” print/braille magnet
  21. Braille-marked Measuring Cups and Spoons
  22. Make Way for Ducklings, print/braille picture book

Read more about specific books and products.